Judge denies bail; Tornado Cash developer will have to spend extra 90 days in jail

Tornado developer Alexey Pertsev will have to spend 90 days in jail, despite the fact that he has not yet been charged with a crime.
Tornado developer Alexey Pertsev will have to spend 90 days in jail, despite the fact that he has not yet been charged with a crime.

Alexey Pertsev, the developer of the Ethereum-based cryptocurrency mixer Tornado Cash that was sanctioned by the United States, will be required to spend a minimum of 90 days in jail, despite the fact that he has not yet been charged with a crime.

The arrest of the developer working on Tornado Cash has caused fury and panic among members of the cryptocurrency community. Several major crypto experts commented on the news, saying that such a move could have severe repercussions for those working on other open-source projects.

At a hearing that took place in the Netherlands on Wednesday (August 24, 2022), the judge determined that Tornado developer Pertsev must be held for an additional three months. The judge did not agree with the demands from Pertsev’s lawyers to release the defendant on bail.

An initial public hearing must take place within the first ninety days, as stated by a representative for the Dutch court.

The backlash from crypto community for sanctioning Tornado

According to a previous report by TheCoinRise, the Dutch authorities detained Pertsev in Amsterdam on the basis that the developer hid fraudulent financial flows and aided money laundering through Tornado Cash.

The arrest has resulted in a number of objections from crypto supporters, who are concerned that a move of this nature could set off a wave of arrests of open-source developers who do not have control over how their codes are utilized.

There is currently a petition for Pertsev’s release that may be found online. The goal is to collect 2,500 signatures. In addition, more than fifty people gathered in Dam Square in Amsterdam to protest against the arrest.

Notably, as we reported, Johns Hopkins University professor of cryptography Matthew Green recently published Tornado Cash code on GitHub with some help from the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF). Moreover, the researcher wanted that the advocacy group would drag GitHub to court if the code gets removed.